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Signs And Symptoms Of Traumatic Brain Injury | Daytona Beach Car Accident Attorney

Signs And Symptoms Of Traumatic Brain Injury

Every year some 1.7 million Americans sustain a traumatic brain injury, including concussions. Of those individuals, 52,000 die, 275,000 are hospitalized, and 1.4 million are treated and released from an emergency department.

These statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention help to underscore the seriousness of traumatic brain injury or TBI.

TBI is caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body that causes the head and brain to move quickly back and forth. This sudden movement can literally cause the brain to bounce around or twist in the skull, damaging brain cells and creating chemical changes in the brain.

Most people with a TBI recover quickly and fully. But for some people, symptoms can last for days, weeks, or longer. And in severe cases, a TBI can lead to coma and even death. In general, recovery may be slower among older adults, young children, and teens. Those who have had a TBI in the past are also at risk of having another one and may find that it takes longer to recover if they have another TBI.

Symptoms of TBI usually fall into four categories:

  • thinking/remembering – difficulty thinking clearly or concentrating
  • physical – headache, fuzzy vision, nausea, fatigue
  • emotional/mood – irritability, sadness, nervousness
  • sleep – sleeping more or less than usual, trouble falling asleep

People with a TBI need to be seen by a health care professional. If you think you or someone you know has a TBI, contact your health care professional. Your health care professional can refer you to a neurologist, neuropsychologist, neurosurgeon, or specialist in rehabilitation (such as a speech pathologist). Getting help soon after the injury by trained specialists may speed recovery.

Rest is very important after a TBI because it helps the brain to heal. Ignoring your symptoms and trying to “tough it out” often makes symptoms worse.

Be patient because healing takes time. Only when your symptoms have reduced significantly, in consultation with your health care professional, should you slowly and gradually return to your daily activities, such as work or school.

If your symptoms come back or you get new symptoms as you become more active, this is a sign that you are pushing yourself too hard. Stop these activities and take more time to rest and recover. As the days go by, you can expect to gradually feel better.

The CDC recommends these tips to help in your recovery:

  • Get plenty of sleep at night, and rest during the day.
  • Avoid activities that are physically demanding (e.g., sports, heavy housecleaning, working-out) or require a lot of concentration (e.g., sustained computer use, video games).
  • Ask your doctor when you can safely drive a car, ride a bike, or operate heavy equipment.
  • Do not drink alcohol. Alcohol and other drugs may slow your recovery and put you at risk of further injury.

For more on safety or medical issues, see the library of articles by Daytona Beach car accident attorney.



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